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THIS IS STRiVE’S 7th ANNUAL FUNDRAISER
FOR CHILDREN!

IT’S An FAMILY-FUN WALK AND ROLL

(FROM STROLLERS TO WHEELCHAIRS)

ON THE BOTANICAL GARDENS SECTION OF THE RIVERFRONT TRAIL.

 

EVENT DETAILS

 

Saturday, October 14th from 10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Following the Walk/Roll there will be a fantastic lunch, music, and

plenty of activities for children and families.

Plus prizes awarded for greatest team spirit, etc.

Proceeds support more than 507 Grand Valley families and

their children with special needs and their families.

STRiVE thanks our  Sponsors

STRiVE’s ‘Rollin’ On The River’ – Hosts Grand Valley Families and Children with Special Needs October 14th

Rollin’ On The River, a family 3K “Walk & Roll” event benefiting STRiVE’s children’s programs, I am writing you today to request your support for this worthwhile event. This is the 7th year for Rollin’ On The River and it is scheduled for Saturday, October 14th from 10 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. on the beautiful Riverfront Trail behind the Western Colorado Botanical Gardens. Proceeds support the very important work being done by STRiVE to provide service and support to children who have been identified as having developmental delays and disabilities. Funds will also be used for STRiVE’s Audyssey program, which supports children and adults on the autism spectrum. Last year, Rollin’ On The River attracted more than 400 participants and raised over $17,000.  It is thrilling to see the support for these children in our community! We are hoping to surpass those numbers this year. By supporting Rollin’ On The River, you will be helping educate the public about the importance of early intervention services for children with developmental delays and disabilities, and providing services to families struggling to support children with autism. One hundred percent of the money raised through Rollin’ On The River will stay right here in Mesa County. Sponsorship levels are attached for you to review

Two days shy of his second birthday, Eilam was diagnosed with a low spectrum, high functioning form of autism. His mother, Krystal, had been concerned about developmental delays in her young son, and after medical check ups, their physician recommended STRiVE’s Infant and Toddler Early Intervention Services. Krystal says she doesn’t believe her son would have progressed as well without STRiVE’s EI program.

“Early Intervention is so crucial in autism,” she says. “Early Intervention has helped Eilam communicate better with his family and his environment,” says Jeanie Larsen, Eilam’s Case Manager. ”In some cases, Early Intervention can help a child catch up developmentally and thus avoid special education services later on,” said Jeanie.

Testimony from a family who has Benefited from the Audyssey Program

MORE ABOUT MULTIDISCIPLINARY DIAGNOSTIC CLINICS

Typical diagnostic evaluation involves a multi-disciplinary team consisting of a behavioral therapist, psychologist, RN, educational specialist, speech and language pathologist and occupational therapist. These assessments will be used to discover how the child functions and the best approach to meet the needs of the child and the family.

MORE ABOUT EARLY INTERVENTION

(Home-based therapeutic intervention for children birth to three, identified as having a developmental delay or disability.) Services include occupational therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy, parent education and early childhood development services. STRiVE served 223 children in EI services in 2016 and now serves 252, a 8% increase.

MORE ABOUT AUDYSSEY

Services include social concepts groups for elementary, middle and high school children, case management, and educational support groups. There are six therapists/counselors; one board certified behavior analyst. Audyssey works closely with JFK Partners and the University of Colorado. Currently, STRiVE’s Audyssey program supports 78 individuals, but statistics show one in 68 children are born with autism. Very limited funding for Audyssey exists at this time. Studies show that it costs $22,560 a year for special education. Only 56% of students with autism finish high school and only 21% of adults with disabilities participate in the labor force.